Aberdeen Global Income Fund, Inc.
(NYSE American: FCO)


Aims to provide high current income by investing primarily in fixed income securities. The Fund also seeks capital appreciation, but only when consistent with its principal investment objective.

As a non-fundamental policy, under normal market conditions, the Fund invests at least 80% of its net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes, in debt securities.

The information contained above provides only a brief summary description of the Fund's investment objective and investment policies.

Daily Prices as of {{asOfDate}}

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The NAV information is provided by the Fund's accounting agent. The price is as reported by the exchange on which the Fund trades. This information is unaudited and neither Aberdeen Asset Management PLC, its wholly owned subsidiaries, the Funds, nor any other person guarantees their accuracy.

Key Facts

Ticker symbol FCO (NYSE American)

Shares outstanding** 8,724,789

Fiscal year ended October 31



* as of 10/31/2017
** as of 10/31/2018

Gross assets** $98.3 Million

Net assets** $69.7 Million

Gross Expense Ratio* 2.78%

Net Expense Ratio* 1.98%

Risk Considerations

International investing entails special risk considerations, including currency fluctuations, lower liquidity, economic and political risks, and differences in accounting methods; these risks are generally heightened for emerging market investments. Concentrating investments in the Asia-Pacific region subjects the Fund to more volatility and greater risk of loss than geographically diverse funds. Fixed income securities are subject to certain risks including, but not limited to: interest rate (changes in interest rates may cause a decline in the market value of an investment), credit (changes in the financial condition of the issuer, borrower, counterparty, or underlying collateral), prepayment (debt issuers may repay or refinance their loans or obligations earlier than anticipated), and extension (principal repayments may not occur as quickly as anticipated, causing the expected maturity of a security to increase).